Search the University of Manchester siteSearch Menu StaffNet
Search type

Research Governance

The Department of Health's Research Governance Framework for Health and Social Care (2001) (the Framework) sets out principles, requirements and standards to ensure that the public can have confidence in, and benefit from, quality research in health and social care.  It defines the mechanisms to deliver them and describes arrangements for monitoring and assessing their implementation.  It aims to improve research and safeguard the public by promoting high scientific, ethical and financial standards, transparent decision-making processes, clear allocation of responsibilities and robust monitoring arrangements.

Why is research governance important?

"Proper governance of research is essential to ensure that the public can have confidence in, and benefit from, quality research in health and social care.  The public has a right to expect high scientific, ethical and financial standards, transparent decision-making processes, clear allocation of responsibilities and robust monitoring arrangements."

It "aims to forestall poor performance, adverse incidents, research misconduct and fraud, and to ensure that lessons are learned and shared when poor practice is identified. Learning from adverse events will promote good practice, enhance the ethical and scientific quality of research, and safeguard the public."

Research Governance Framework for Health and Social Care Department of Health

Who does the Department of Health's Research Governance Framework apply to?

The Department of Health's Framework applies to those designing, participating in, hosting, funding, managing or undertaking research where the research is concerned with the protection and promotion of public health, undertaken in or by the Department of Health, its non-Departmental Public Bodies and the NHS or undertaken by or within social care agencies.  It includes clinical and non-clinical research, research undertaken by NHS or social care staff using the resources of health and social care organisations and any research undertaken by industry, charities, research councils and universities within the health and social care systems that might have an impact on the quality of those services.