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Science underpins our everyday lives and presenting your research through the media as a channel to highlight your work to the public and other audiences is part of our social responsibility. The public are interested in what researchers are up to, why they are doing it and how new discoveries and innovations will impact on their lives.

•             Inform public discourse including the formation of public attitudes, values and understanding.

•             Add evidence to a debate and impact on policy-development

•             Enthuse the public and future generations of scientists

•             Get your area of research noticed and boost citations

•             Generate new collaborations

•             Increase funding for UK bioscience 

What makes your research newsworthy?

What is the ‘hook’ that makes your research newsworthy? This can be the publication of a paper in a peer- reviewed journal, a presentation of data at an international conference or being awarded research funding. 

In general, the media prefer to know about real outcomes, discoveries and impact rather than hypothetical ones so finished projects are likely to get more coverage. 

A meaningful soundbite explaining the significance of the research and what the findings mean is essential. The story should use simple, jargon-free language to explain how your findings came about alongside some facts and figures together with a great picture will work wonders to elevate your story. 

What can you do to promote the MIB? 

•             Let me know if you have a highlight publication that you wish to promote.

•             Offer to be an ‘expert’ on your given topic available for interviews.

•             Think beyond print - provide photos, images, video content and audio.

•             Let me know if a journalist has been in touch.

Web Highlight Publications 

If you have any publications that you wish to highlight please provide me with the following: 

1.            a snappy title [less than 15 words] 

2.            a brief statement of the article's focus/contribution [15 - 45 words] 

3.            a related copyright-free image [any format, any aspect ratio, highest resolution as possible] 

4.            a caption for the image [less than 50 words] 

5.            a description of the paper's content in general science terms that non specialists will understand [150 - 400 words], explaining its importance. 

6.            links to any related websites as well any special information about the article (i.e selected by F1000, Editor's choice etc). 

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